MOBILE SERVICES

OLIVERIAN AUTOMOTIVE offers mobile programming and diagnosing to independent automotive repair businesses and body shops. We understand there are times a vehicle is brought to your business and you have diagnosed a faulty module. At this time, it needs to be programmed or maybe even a reprogramming needs to be performed.

Not all businesses have all the OE tooling to perform programming. The following is a list of OE tooling we do have and offer reprogramming services for: GM, Ford, Chrysler, Kia, Hyundai, Honda, Toyota, Mazda, Nissan, BMW, Volkswagen, AUDI, Acura, Lexus, Dodge and Jeep.

Vehicles that are drivable may be brought to our facility, or we can go to your business. If the vehicle is not drivable, it is more feasible for us to come to you. At this point, you would need to contact our business to make arrangements so we may service your needs. There will be specific questions the service advisor will ask you. These questions are important in order for us to better service you and to eliminate any misunderstandings or unforeseen problems. Each manufacturer plays by a different set of rules when it comes to programming their vehicles.

No Extra Costs

why use our busines?

You have a vehicle in your shop (example) with a new PCM installed. It now does not crank or run. You now need to have the PCM programmed and an immobilizer performed on most models.

If you have to tow it to the dealer, there is a cost associated with towing. You will then have to pay the dealer to perform the task. You may also be at the mercy of the dealer with no control and a customer who is not understanding of the extra costs associated with the repair. Furthermore, it will take two people out of your business to retrieve the customer’s vehicle.

Lastly, the customer might say they should have taken it to the dealer to begin with because they would not have incurred the extra costs. This can be an unpopular subject for all parties involved and can result in lost customer’s confidence and retention.

We can help with the issues listed above. If you know the module needs to be programmed prior to install, call our service advisor and provide the details. We will quote a price to come out to your facility and program the module.

DIAGNOSTICS

Diagnostic

Over the years, customers have heard the term “diagnostics” or “diagnosis”. Most people understand the meaning, but others are unclear. When working on vehicles, it is not always clear and concise as to what is happening to the vehicle and for what reason.

Thus, we use the words like “diagnostics” or “diagnosis.” The word diagnosis means to investigate or perform an analysis of the cause or nature of a condition, situation, or problem.

Keeping with the definition outlined above, when brining a vehicle to our shop for an issue such as the vehicle runs rough or stalls, it will need to be diagnosed to determine the route cause. Automotive technicians are like doctors. We have to use a diagnostic strategy approach to determine a path of flow of diagnostics.

Like a doctor, when you first arrive at the office, the receptionist will gather your information, ask you specific questions as to the nature of your concern. Afterwards the nurse or an associate will take your vitals. Once this part is completed, the doctor will review the information gathered before he/she enters the room to discuss the nature of your concerns. Based on their questions, examination, and testing, they will make a preliminary prognosis or may even require you to see a specialist.

We here at OLIVERIAN AUTOMOTIVE utilize the same approach. When you first arrive, the Service advisor will gather your information, ask specific questions as to the nature of your concern(s) with the vehicle. Once the information is gathered, they will they ask you to authorize a particular amount of time to examine your vehicle depending on the nature of your concern. You may ask what does this authorization or charge consist of?

Here is our standard procedure based on an engine runs
rough and the check engine light is illuminated.

General procedures:

The technician assigned to your vehicle will first acquire the proper diagnostic tool (scanner) and connect it to your vehicle. The technician will then perform a full scan of all the codes present within the modules on your vehicle. Once this task is done the faults are recorded and a partial diagnostic plan is formulated as to a diagnostic approach. The technical will then drive and monitor the scan data to verify your complaint and determine a path of flow of diagnostics.

Once the technician returns from the test drive, he/she will select the proper diagnostic strategy whether it is based on their personal knowledge or utilizing SI (service information) provided by the manufacturer. This all takes time. If the technician cannot determine the root cause within the allotted time frame, a further in-depth diagnosis will be needed, including utilizing a lab scope or other specialty tool. You will be called to authorize more time.

Pin-Point testing:

Pin point testing is the process whereby we have formulated a diagnostic strategy and now either need to follow a flow chart provided by the manufacturer or personal experience. Diagnostic flow chart can either be short quick tests or detailed tests. Each test time is different due to accessibility to components, connectors, or wring. The manufacturers do not make it easy on us technicians. Have you looked under your hood lately? Manufacturers like to utilize every bit of space available to them and sometimes place connectors and components where they are not easily accessible. This requires additional diagnosing time. The customer must understand this is what they are being charge for. It is not the fault of the technician—just manufacture design.

Once the technical has determine the cause, he/she will provide an estimate of repairs. The service advisor will call you with a quote to correct the concern based on his/her diagnosis.

Diagnostic tools

DIAGNOSTIC TOOLS

Keeping Up with Today’s Technology:

The technician assigned to your vehicle will first acquire the proper diagnostic tool (scanner) and connect it to your vehicle. The technician will then perform a full scan of all the codes present within the modules on your vehicle. Once this task is done the faults are recorded and a partial diagnostic plan is formulated as to a diagnostic approach. The technical will then drive and monitor the scan data to verify your complaint and determine a path of flow of diagnostics.

Once the technician returns from the test drive, he/she will select the proper diagnostic strategy whether it is based on their personal knowledge or utilizing SI (service information) provided by the manufacturer. This all takes time. If the technician cannot determine the root cause within the allotted time frame, a further in-depth diagnosis will be needed, including utilizing a lab scope or other specialty tool. You will be called to authorize more time.

There is another reason why we have purchased the manufacturer tools. Today’s vehicles have serval modules which allow the vehicle to operate. The average new vehicle has 20 plus modules incorporated into them. If a module were to be inoperative or diagnosed as being faulty, it will have to be replaced.

This is where the manufacture tool comes into play. Most modules provided new by the manufacturer are shipped blank. This means there is no information stored in the module. It is considered a generic module at this time. With this being said, it will be necessary to program the module with the software needed to make it function correctly as intended by the manufacturer. There is no aftermarket scanner on the market which can provide this procedure.

Another advantage of having the manufacturer scanner is there may be instances whereby a customer may complain about a particular problem. Let’s use for an example, a Dodge Grand Caravan. The customer complaint is the heating and cooling unit switches from hot to cold at times. There is a TSB (technical service bulletin) on some models and years to reprogram the HVAC module to correct this issue.

Diagnostic tools

ADAS

 

Our vehicles are becoming more technically evolved and the manufacturers work toward autonomous vehicles which will drive themselves without driver input. Our way of life and the way we do business will change greatly in the next 10-20 years. Advanced changes in technology have made this possible. Most vehicles incorporate several components to assist or aid the driver while they are navigating today’s road ways.

camera

The camera is mounted in the windshield by the rear-view mirror. This is the most common setup utilized by today’s manufacturers. It is a 1-2-pixel camera which only see’s Black & White.

The camera, when activated by the driver, will monitor the road in front of the vehicle. This is commonly referred to as LDW (Lane Departure Warning) or LKAS (Lane Keeping Assist System). Subaru utilizes a system called EyeSight.

Being the camera only sees Black & White, it is looking for the White or Yellow lines (camera will interpret the Yellow as White) on the road way. The software built into the vehicle’s ECU’s warns or assists the driver when activated. The warnings can vary between manufacturer and each manufacturer will normally allow the driver to change the sensitivity of the warnings. These warnings can be audible, visual and vibrations. They can also incorporate all three warnings as well, depending on the settings and manufacturer.

It is important to know that there are limitations to the camera. There are factors which can affect the operation or disable the operation of the camera. Some contributors are snow covered roadways, heavy rain, faded painted lines on the roadway, dust, dirt, or an object on the windshield obscuring the view of the camera. A windshield which has been replaced with a non-OE (Original Equipment) can cause the camera to not function as designed.

In almost all cases, if the windshield or camera has been either removed or replaced, the system must be recalibrated to ensure proper operation as prescribed by the manufacturer. These calibrations are either done statically, dynamically, or a combination of both.

We offer these calibration services at our facility. There is no need to go to the dealer for calibrations. We also have the capability to diagnose these systems if you should every experience an issue.

It is important that each windshield company, collision center, or automotive repair facility read and understand the repair procedures or position statements provided by the manufacturer. If a repair is made to the vehicle which requires a calibration to be performed, it is their responsibility to ensure this is performed.

radar

Most vehicles which have a radar incorporated have it in the front of the vehicle. This radar may or may not be visible. If visible it will be mounted in the center of the vehicle or to the left or right. The radars which are not visible can be mounted behind the fascia or emblem of the vehicle.

These radars, when activated, emit a pulse (echo if you wish) in front of the vehicle. They may either be short- or long-range pulses. It is the radar’s responsibility to determine large objects in front of the vehicle and to maintain distance either by slowing down the vehicle or increasing the speed of the vehicle to maintain proper distance. When utilized with a camera system (most vehicles which have either a camera or radar have both components), this is called a Fusion. They work in unison with each other to assist and warn the driver. If a vehicle is equipped with these systems, most but not all, with have FCW (Forward Collision Warning). The FCW or also known as Collision Mitigation Systems, will control the braking system of the vehicle by either slowing down the vehicle gradually or possibly if the ECU determines a potential impact is possible will be more aggressive in nature.

The radar is sometimes called the ACC (Adaptive Cruise Control) or ICC (Intelligent Cruise Control). They may have short- and long-range settings to keep proper distance between vehicles.

When the radar is replaced, some will require programming or coding or a combination of both. They will also require calibration afterwards. The calibration may be static, dynamic, or combination of both.

It is important to remember when removing or replacing the radar components, the repair facility or collision center reads the repair instructions thoroughly. Most will state the vehicle will require calibration afterwards and will require a two- or four-wheel alignment to set the trust angle prior to calibration.

When a repair facility or collision center makes suspension repairs or changes the tires or tire sizes, it is once again important to read the repair information as some manufacturers require a recalibration afterwards.

LANEWATCH

LaneWatch is Honda terminology. LaneWatch has a camera built into the right-side exterior mirror. If the mirror is replaced or removed for any reason, it should be recalibrated for accuracy. When you operate and turn the right side turn signal switch on, the camera is activated and sends a digital image to the infotainment screen in order to give the driver a visual before making a lane change. If the mirror has been replaced, you will get a message in the infotainment screen indicating a calibration is required.

avm

Commonly known as All Around View by most manufacturers, AVM is becoming more and more widely used. The system incorporates a camera in the front fascia, the rear fascia, and the left and right-side mirrors. This system may also be called Bird’s Eye View. The system enables the customer to have a 360° view all around the vehicle. The AVM is presented on the infotainment screen of the vehicle. These systems usually require calibration after components are replaced, collision repairs have been made, or components have been removed for other repairs. It is important to read the service information warning statements or position statements when working on or repairing these systems.

BSD, SOD, BSI

Blind Spot Detection, Side Object Detection, or Blind Spot Information. These systems have so many different names and variations it is hard to actually keep up. The vehicles equipped with these systems, when driving down the road, notify the driver of approaching vehicles in a potential blind area which is not visible when looking into your side mirrors. Normally an indicator will be illuminated on the mirror, and blink or stay illuminated, when a vehicle is approaching. Some manufacturers will have audible warnings, shake the steering wheel, or resist when a driver attempts to move left or right when a possible vehicle is in a blind spot.

Another feature of these systems is when parked and placed into reverse, and when navigating rearwards, the vehicle can detect other vehicles or objects potentially approaching either from the left or right of the rear of the vehicle. It can apply the brakes to avoid a potential accident. This is normally referred to as Cross Traffic Alert.

Not all of the BSD, SOD, or BSI require calibration. Some just require programming and then are operational when installed. Others may require the rear fascia be removed to check proper alignment utilizing targeting tooling.

NVC

NVC (Night Vision Camera) are more prevalent on higher end manufacturer vehicles such as Mercedes, BMW, VW/Audi, and Cadillac, but are filtering down to most daily driving vehicles as more options are being added to the vehicles.

The Night Vision Camera equipped vehicles offer great capability while driving at night. They are equipped with a camera which also incorporate thermo infrared imaging which detects objects at night such as animals, pedestrians, other vehicles, or objects which may pose a potential risk of collision. The system identifies these objects and notifies the driver and takes appropriate action when activated.

These systems are highly advanced and expensive. Thus, they are normally incorporated on higher end vehicles. Most systems will require some form of programming or coding when replaced and a calibration afterwards. As always, reference service information and position statements when removing or replacing these components.

tsr

Traffic Sign Recognition is available on some manufacturer vehicles. This feature is widely used in Europe and is slowly migrating to the US. This feature, which utilizes the camera for LDW or LKAS systems, is an enhancement and enables the driver to activate the system and maintain the posted road sign speed without worry of speeding.

AFL

Adaptive Front Lighting systems are becoming more and more common to aid the driver at night time. These systems are very adaptive and can increase or decrease the visibility of the driver operating the vehicle. This feature greatly improves one’s ability to see at night while driving.

Depending on the manufacturer, a lot of these systems will need to be calibrated and either programmed or coded after replacement.

fcw

Forward Collision Warning is a popular feature on vehicles equipped with ADAS features and is becoming more of a standard option on today’s vehicles. When activated by the driver, this feature can minimize potential accidents and warn the driver of a potential collision event.

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